Monday, December 7, 2009

How my morning began today.

Read This

I was just preparing to drink my first cup of morning tea, when I chanced upon this ridiculous article in The Telegraph today. The article talks about how Emergency Contraceptive Pills are being used by young girls indiscriminately. Here's how the article begins-

Shreya Pal, 25, doesn’t think twice before popping an emergency contraceptive pill. “Well, I really can’t be bothered about side effects when there is an emergency.” And how often do such emergencies arise? At most about twice a week, she reveals after much prodding.

I believe that this article is a veiled way of  articulating that there should be impositions and censures on  women's right to choose. By making the ECP a prescriptive drug, governments will subject women to go through the humiliation of having to go to gynaecologists who often condescendingly moralise instead of just doing their jobs. Also, the article is skewed, one sided and biased. Not once does it mention the social pressures that women have to go through, not once does it talk about the fact that the introduction of such a law will mean that many responsible individuals have to now subject themselves to agonising scrutiny and be denied their right to choose.

What do you think?

11 comments:

Rhea Silvia said...

wtf do they need to know whether she pops ECPs twice a week or month or year?

we doing the woman-does-not-own-her-body thing again?

Reeti said...

@ anomitra : evidently. makes my blood boil.

Priyanka said...

I haven't read the article and I agree about gynaecs moralising unnecessarily but I do know of people who have taken the pill out of unwarranted paranoia. And it does make you inordinately sick, much more than a painkiller does. It's stupid not to be aware of the side-effects but The Telegraph isn't exactly known for quality journalism, right? Didn't they drape some netas in sarees sometime back?

Reeti said...
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Reeti said...

@ Priyanka : I am by no means saying that the pills are the best way to go about things, but I think people should be given a right to choose.

precisely said...

What should be done is very simple, and i think it's already being done - include a pamphlet or some such thing with a list of the possible side-effects. A sort of statutory warning - like with cigarettes. After that, it's a matter of free choice. But no. What must they do? They must make them prescription drugs. Disgusting.

KittyCat said...

the pamphlets are already provided with the pills. talking in detail about side effects, rates of failure (which the TT journalist flaunts like she's Alva edison and just seen light)etc. And does everyone feel so ill after taking the morning after pill? I think side effects vary from person to person. I feel horrible each time i take a Decolic. But I've never felt any noticeable effects after taking an ECP.

saptarshi said...

No. See, I think what the writer meant is quite different. Many people confuse the risks of pregnancy and HIV infection.

Popping an ECP has very strong effects on a woman's hormonal balance and should be taken only in case of emergencies. But ECPs are fast becoming a substitute for protection (condoms) for many ill-informed people. Consequently it is also leading to higher risks of HIV transmission.

The solution is not making ECPs prescription drugs, but to create awareness. The current breed of ECP ads are very misleading and on purpose.

Reeti said...
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Reeti said...

@ saptarshi : I agree with most of what you are saying, but I still feel that the article could have been better articulated. If you read the article carefully, it keeps harping on making it a prescription drug. Also, I disliked the tone of the article and thought it was irresponsible reporting.

One should definitely harp on the cons, but not keep insisting that they should be made prescription drugs. The ads are misleading yes, but what ad isn't? There is no mention of anything being done about the ads or any suggestion of that sort.

Aditya said...

I believe all ECPs are accompanied by sufficient literature pointing out the possible side-effects. It is the woman's prerogative to decide how often she chooses to use the pill, and therefore there is no space for the decisions of middle-aged men with criminal records. It is assumed that women are aware of the consequences of excessive use of such pills, and as rational beings they are entitled to choose what's best for their health. People live and die by their informed choices, and State paternalism cannot be justified by the stupid behaviour of those who associate truth claims with television adverts.